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'I Heard You Paint Houses', Updated Edition
Cover of 'I Heard You Paint Houses', Updated Edition
'I Heard You Paint Houses', Updated Edition
Frank 'The Irishman' Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa
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Soon to be a NETFLIX film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci and Harvey Keitel, and written by Steven Zaillian.
Updated with a 57-page Conclusion by the author that features new, independent corroboration of Frank Sheeran's revelations about the killing of Jimmy Hoffa, the killing of Joey Gallo and the murder of JFK, along with stories that could not be told before.

The first words Jimmy Hoffa ever spoke to Frank "the Irishman" Sheeran were, "I heard you paint houses." To paint a house is to kill a man. The paint is the blood that splatters on the walls and floors. In the course of nearly five years of recorded interviews Frank Sheeran confessed to Charles Brandt that he handled more than twenty-five hits for the mob, and for his friend Hoffa.
Sheeran learned to kill in the U.S. Army, where he saw an astonishing 411 days of active combat duty in Italy during World War II. After returning home he became a hustler and hit man, working for legendary crime boss Russell Bufalino. Eventually he would rise to a position of such prominence that in a RICO suit then-U.S. Attorney Rudy Giuliani would name him as one of only two non-Italians on a list of 26 top mob figures.
When Bufalino ordered Sheeran to kill Hoffa, he did the deed, knowing that if he had refused he would have been killed himself.
Sheeran's important and fascinating story includes new information on other famous murders including those of Joey Gallo and JFK, and provides rare insight to a chapter in American history. Charles Brandt has written a page-turner that has become a true crime classic.
Soon to be a NETFLIX film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci and Harvey Keitel, and written by Steven Zaillian.
Updated with a 57-page Conclusion by the author that features new, independent corroboration of Frank Sheeran's revelations about the killing of Jimmy Hoffa, the killing of Joey Gallo and the murder of JFK, along with stories that could not be told before.

The first words Jimmy Hoffa ever spoke to Frank "the Irishman" Sheeran were, "I heard you paint houses." To paint a house is to kill a man. The paint is the blood that splatters on the walls and floors. In the course of nearly five years of recorded interviews Frank Sheeran confessed to Charles Brandt that he handled more than twenty-five hits for the mob, and for his friend Hoffa.
Sheeran learned to kill in the U.S. Army, where he saw an astonishing 411 days of active combat duty in Italy during World War II. After returning home he became a hustler and hit man, working for legendary crime boss Russell Bufalino. Eventually he would rise to a position of such prominence that in a RICO suit then-U.S. Attorney Rudy Giuliani would name him as one of only two non-Italians on a list of 26 top mob figures.
When Bufalino ordered Sheeran to kill Hoffa, he did the deed, knowing that if he had refused he would have been killed himself.
Sheeran's important and fascinating story includes new information on other famous murders including those of Joey Gallo and JFK, and provides rare insight to a chapter in American history. Charles Brandt has written a page-turner that has become a true crime classic.
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Excerpts-
  • From the book "They Wouldn't Dare"
    I asked my boss, Russell "McGee" Bufalino, to let me call Jimmy at his
    cottage by the lake. I was on a peace mission. All I was trying to do at
    that particular time was keep this thing from happening to Jimmy.
    I reached out for Jimmy on Sunday afternoon, July 27, 1975. Jimmy
    was gone by Wednesday, July 30. Sadly, as we say, gone to Australia —
    down under. I will miss my friend until the day I join him.
    I was at my own apartment in Philly using my own phone when I
    made the long-distance call to Jimmy's cottage at Lake Orion near
    Detroit. If I had been in on the thing on Sunday I would have used a pay
    phone, not my own phone. You don't survive as long as I did by making
    calls about importantmatters fromyour own phone. I wasn'tmade with
    a finger. My father used the real thing to get my mother pregnant.
    While I was in my kitchen standing by my rotary wall phone getting
    ready to dial the number I knew by heart, I gave some consideration
    to just how I was going to approach Jimmy. I learned during my years
    of union negotiations that it always was best to review things in your
    mind first before you opened your mouth. And besides that, this call
    was not going to be an easy one.
    When he got out of jail on a presidential pardon by Nixon in 1971,
    and he began fighting to reclaim the presidency of the Teamsters,
    Jimmy became very hard to talk to. Sometimes you see that with guys
    when they first get out. Jimmy became reckless with his tongue — on
    the radio, in the papers, on television. Every time he opened his
    mouth he said something about how he was going to expose the
    mob and get the mob out of the union. He even said he was going to
    keep the mob from using the pension fund. I can't imagine certain
    people liked hearing that their golden goose would be killed if he got
    back in. All this coming from Jimmy was hypocritical to say the least,
    considering Jimmy was the one who brought the so-called mob into
    the union and the pension fund in the first place. Jimmy brought me
    into the union through Russell. With very good reason I was concerned
    for my friend more than a little bit.
    I started getting concerned about nine months before this telephone
    call that Russell was letting me make. Jimmy had flown out to
    Philly to be the featured speaker at Frank Sheeran Appreciation Night
    at the Latin Casino. There were 3,000 of my good friends and family,
    including the mayor, the district attorney, guys I fought in the war
    with, the singer Jerry Vale and the Golddigger Dancers with legs that
    didn't quit, and certain other guests the FBI would call La Cosa
    Nostra. Jimmy presented me with a gold watch encircled with diamonds.
    Jimmy looked at the guests on the dais and said, "I never realized
    you were that strong." That was a special comment because
    Jimmy Hoffa was one of the two greatest men I ever met.
    Before they brought the dinner of prime rib, and when we were getting
    our pictures taken, some little nobody that Jimmy was in jail
    with asked Jimmy for ten grand for a business venture. Jimmy reached
    in his pocket and gave him $2,500. That was Jimmy — a soft touch.
    Naturally, Russell Bufalino was there. He was the other one of the
    two greatest men that I ever met. Jerry Vale sang Russ's favorite song,
    "Spanish Eyes," for him. Russell was boss of the Bufalino family of
    upstate Pennsylvania, and large parts of New York, New Jersey, and
    Florida. Being headquartered outside New York City, Russell wasn't in
    the inner circle of New York's five families, but...
About the Author-
  • Born and raised in New York City, Charles Brandt is a former junior high school English teacher, welfare investigator in East Harlem, homicide prosecutor, and Chief Deputy Attorney General of the State of Delaware. In private practice since 1976, Brandt has been president of the Delaware Trial Lawyers Association and the Delaware Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates. He has been named by his peers to both Best Lawyers in America and Best Lawyers in Delaware. He is a frequent speaker on cross-examination and interrogation techniques for reluctant witnesses. Brandt is the author of a novel based on major cases he solved through interrogation, The Right to Remain Silent. He is also the co-author of Joe Pistone's Donnie Brasco: Unfinished Business and of Lin DeVecchio's We're Going to Win This Thing: The Shocking Frame-Up of a Mafia Crime Buster.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    May 31, 2004
    Former prosecutor Brandt promises more than he delivers in this rambling account of the career of Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa that's long on sensational claims and short on credibility. Brandt crafts a first-person narrative for Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran, a confessed murderer and close associate of Hoffa's who died last year, while doing little to verify Sheeran's many fantastic yarns, which include responsibility for supplying rifles for the real assassins of President Kennedy. In his most plausible boast, Sheeran names Hoffa's killer. To his credit, Brandt refers to evidence undermining his source's veracity: another publisher canceled this title after a letter Hoffa supposedly wrote supporting much of Sheeran's story was found to be a forgery. The author's uncritical acceptance is perhaps explained by his relationship with his subject. Brandt admits that he served as a pallbearer for Sheeran "ecause of all that was positive" in the life of a vicious thug who cheated the union he was supposed to serve. Agent, Frank Weimann at the Literary Group.
    (June 1)

    Forecast:
    After breaking the story of who killed Hoffa on May 30 on
    Fox News Live Weekend Edition, Fox News will follow up with a
    Fox & Friends feature on June 1. Expect healthy initial sales.

  • Trial Magazine "Is Sheeran believable? Very . . . and 'I Heard You Paint Houses' is a very enjoyable book."
  • Delaware News Journal "A page-turning account of one man's descent into the mob."
  • Professor Arthur Sloane, author of Hoffa "I'm fully convinced – now – that Sheeran was in fact the man who did the deed. And I'm impressed, too, by the book's readability and by its factual accuracy in all areas on which I'm qualified to pass judgment. Charles Brandt has solved the Hoffa mystery."
  • New York Daily News "Told with such economy and chilling force as to make The Sopranos suddenly seem overwrought and theatrical."
  • Kansas City Star "A terrific read."
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    Steerforth Press
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'I Heard You Paint Houses', Updated Edition
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Frank 'The Irishman' Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa
Charles Brandt
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